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Advances in Science and Research Contributions in Applied Meteorology and Climatology
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Volume 14
Adv. Sci. Res., 14, 153–156, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/asr-14-153-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Adv. Sci. Res., 14, 153–156, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/asr-14-153-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  13 Jun 2017

13 Jun 2017

Severe weather as a spectacle: the Meteo-Show

Iñaki Orbe1,2 and Santiago Gaztelumendi1,2 Iñaki Orbe and Santiago Gaztelumendi
  • 1Basque Meteorology Agency (EUSKALMET), Basque Country, Spain
  • 2Meteorology Area, Energy and Environment Division, TECNALIA R & I, Basque Country, Spain

Abstract. In this work we focus on perhaps one of the worst journalist practice when dealing with severe weather, the Meteo-Show or the extended practice, especially in TV, for using weather and meteorology for spectacle. Journalism today has found weather information in a real goldmine in terms of audience due to the growing public interest in this matter. However, as it happens with other content, sensationalism and exaggeration have also reached weather information, primarily when episodes of adverse nature (snow, heavy rain, floods, etc.) are addressed. In this paper we look to identify the worst practices in weather communication through analysis of examples from real journalist work. We present some keys to understand this trend, highlighting the ingredients that are present in the worst Meteo-show.

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